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It’s an easy mistake.

Once you know it, you’ll see it happening on most websites.

Let me ask you:

What’s the purpose of your about page? That’s obvious, isn’t it?

It’s about your company. Your history. Your products. Maybe some stuff about you personally. That’s it.


Not quite.

That shouldn’t be the main focus.

The about page on your website is a “sales” page, encouraging readers to get in touch or join your newsletter. And like every sales page, your about page should focus on your readers, engaging and inspiring them.

Let’s look at the five essential keys — five “best practices” — for creating an about page that converts.

1. Explain why people should work with you

The question your about page should answer is this: Which problems do you solve for your customers?

Pamela’s about page, for instance, doesn’t start with an about me section. Instead, her headline is:

Let’s Grow Your Business With Great Design and Marketing

This headline addresses you as business owner by talking about your business. You instantly know how Pamela can help you.

My own about page takes a similar approach. The headline asks you:

How can I help you grow your business?

And after the headline I specify the two ways I can help you build your business:

Looking to hire a copywriter?

Or want to improve your own writing skills so you can win more clients?

To attract people to your company, start with explaining how you can help them. Show them they’ve arrived in the right place.

2. Boost your credibility

To get people to hire you or buy from you, you need to establish your credibility as an expert. Answer these questions:

  • What work experience demonstrates your expertise?
  • How does your education contribute to success?
  • Which awards have you won?
  • Do you have client testimonials or quotes you can include?
  • Have you appeared in any well-known publications?

Pamela, for instance, mentions she’s been helping small businesses and large organizations create “big brands” since 1987. By using a specific year she changes a wishy-washy statement into a credibility-boosting fact. Specific names, brands, years, or other facts boost your credibility.

Your about page isn’t a complete resume of everything you’ve done. Carefully pick the facts that substantiate why you’re the right person to help your readers.

3. Show your passion

What drives you? What do you believe in?

Sharing your passion inspires and energizes readers. Your best clients are the people who resonate most with your way of doing business, with your beliefs.

A “mission statement” provides a great way to show what drives you. And I don’t mean a corporate statement full of gobbledygook and written by committee. I mean a statement that gives us a glimpse of your passion.

This is how Pamela describes her passion:

She believes that your business may be small, but your brand can be BIG.

And this is how I formulate it on my site:

Henneke Duistermaat is an irreverent copywriter and marketer. She’s on a mission to stamp out gobbledygook, and to add sparkle to boring business blogs.

What do you believe in? What do you want to achieve with your work? If you struggle to define this, think about what you don’t believe in. I list on my site:

  • I don’t like to do as I’m told–expect honest feedback to your suggestions.
  • I don’t polish existing text–you get most out of working with me when you involve me from the start of your project.
  • I hate gobbledygook, and refuse to write phrases like market-leading, best-in-class, and state-of-the-art–hire me to write simple content that converts.

Sharing your beliefs filters out the people who aren’t right for your business. Your mission appeals to the clients you love working with most.

4. Add a dash of personality

Why do people choose to work with you?

Of course you need to have the right expertise, knowledge, and skills. But your main attraction as a small business owner or freelancer is your personality. People choose you because your content resonates with them. They choose you because of who you are and how you work.

What’s your personality?

  • Are you friendly or more corporate?
  • High-energy or more analytical?
  • Serious or fun?

For more help with defining your brand and personality, download your brand personality worksheet.

Rather than tell people you’re friendly or fun, show it to them in your writing. For instance:

  • To make your content friendlier, use everyday words and ask more questions
  • To show you’re energetic, make your sentences shorter, and use sensory and emotional words
  • To display more seriousness, include more details, avoid exclamation marks, and use slightly longer sentences

Personality isn’t just about your writing. Your imagery and design play an important role. Include at least one photo:

  • Show a welcoming smile
  • Don’t cross your arms because it looks like you’re blocking the outside world
  • Look directly to the reader or towards your content, because readers naturally follow your gaze
  • Choose clothing that suits your personality — a jacket looks more corporate than a t-shirt
  • Consider wearing your brand colors

An about page without personality is like a book with a ho-hum cover. Nobody wants to read it because nobody gets excited.

5. Invite people to take action

What is the purpose of your about page?

What’s the next step your readers should take?

Do you want people to email you to ask for a quote? Do you want them to check out your product pages? Would you like them to join your email list?

Pamela has a clear call to action on her about page:

Get my free Marketing Toolkit and start growing your business with great design and marketing

And she gives you further incentive to sign up by sharing testimonials for her emails:

“Look, you’re guaranteed to learn something every time you read Pamela Wilson’s blog. I know I do.” –DEREK HALPERN, Social Triggers

What would you like your readers to do? And how can you encourage them to do so?

How to create a sparkling ‘about’ page

Average is boring.

Blending in is dull.

Make yourself stand out by being yourself. Attract the right clients by being YOU.

In a world of pixels, viral cats, and meaningless likes, we’re all looking for the human touch. For real voices. For personal connections.

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9 thoughts on “The 5 Essential Keys to a Tantalizing ‘About’ Page

  1. Thanks Henneke! Great timing for me.

    I’m about to re-do my about page for my new site (again!) and this is perfect advice.

    One thing that I really LOVE about Internet Marketing is that it works best when “you act like you”. Many of us are so afraid of becoming SPAM monsters or the Smarmy-Salesman that we sabotage ourselves out of this fear.

    But once you realize that you are unique and you have a unique gift and voice for the world, you can find and be your true self and start making a difference.

    Thanks for making a difference with this post!


    • Hi David,

      Yes, I so agree with you. We’re often afraid to show ourselves and try to hide behind a shiny mask. But the best way to stand out is by being ourselves. And that’s how we also attract our favorite clients.

      So glad to hear this post will help you with your About page!


  2. I really enjoyed this article. Very informative. Now I knew this stuff but it was laid out in such a way as to really hit the point home!!!

  3. Hey Henneke,

    One of the things I like most about your About Page is how your personality shines through. You say a lot about who you are in your sassy “beware” list.

    And Pamela, I would say your entire site is your About Page. Your personality shines through in the way you designed the pages and the lovely colors you use.

    Thanks, Henneke

    • Thank you, Julia. And yes, I agree with you on Pamela’s website – I also like how she has a nice, friendly picture in the footer of each page.

  4. Henneke, THIS–> “In a world of pixels, viral cats, and meaningless likes, we’re all looking for the human touch. For real voices. For personal connections.” is pretty much what ALL online content and community building is about. You’ve summed it up beautifully!!

    Thank YOU for showing us how to infuse it into our About Pages too!! Love this post and your actionable tips!!

    • Thank you so much, Prerna.

      The expression “in real life” (as opposed to “online”) doesn’t make sense to me – my online friends are real friends, too. Online connections are REAL relationships. They’re precious. 🙂

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