The Top 4 Things the NFL Can Teach You About Marketing

I’m very happy to feature a guest post from Laura Petrolino today. As you’ll see, Laura has a favorite past time: football. When you read her bio at the end of the post, you’ll ask the same question I did: “how does this woman have time to watch football?” She does, though, and this post is proof that she gets a lot out of it! –Pamela Wilson

brand marketing with tips from the NFL

Football is like life — it requires perseverance, self-denial, hard work, sacrifice, dedication and respect for authority. –Vince Lombardi

brand marketing with ideas for your business from LauraFootball is more than a game. It is about strategy, about fully utilizing your resources, about adjusting to sudden change … and, of course, about pleasing your fans.

We can learn a lot about life from the game of football. Whether it be business, personal, spiritual or psychological; many of life’s great questions can be answered by analyzing the way things are done on the field, and marketing is no exception.

Read article …The Top 4 Things the NFL Can Teach You About Marketing

Make Your Brand Big for Free!

EDIT: This course is now retired. Thanks for your interest!

Congratulations to Michele Christensen, Cathy Jennings and Zach Hammer, who all won a spot in the Big Brand System course! Thanks to every one of you for your comments.

You want your business marketing to reflect the level of quality and service you offer, but you can’t afford to hire a professional designer or ad agency. Even if you don’t have a marketing budget of tens of thousands of dollars, you know you must have marketing materials that are effective and look great if you want your business to thrive.

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how to make a brand big with a sneak peek at the Big Brand System course

The Big Brand System is the only online course that teaches small business owners how to successfully design their own marketing materials. Whether you do business online or offline, and whether you sell products or services, the Big Brand System will teach you to create effective marketing materials that get results. Weekly lessons will build your knowledge from the ground up, so you will master the techniques you need to create professional looking marketing materials that work.

As a member of the course, you can get your questions answered on the Big Brand System Forum. I’ll give you the attention you need so you can master the information you’re learning. I’ll share secrets it has taken me 25 years to learn! Plus, you’ll have the opportunity to interact (and network) with other business owners who are working to grow their businesses with great marketing, too.

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Why I Hate the Verdana Font 1

Why I Hate the Verdana Font

Of all the web-compatible typefaces available, the least appealing is the Verdana font.

And yes, I know it’s used all over. Believe me, I notice!

We’ve spoken about choosing typefaces and brand fonts a lot around here.

Your font matters — maybe more than you realize. Think about it:

Your font choice become the visual voice of your brand. Your words are delivered wrapped in fonts — is your font speaking in the brand voice you want?

So, is Verdana a good font choice, or a bad one?

The Verdana font was one of the earliest fonts designed for reading on screens. It’s a “web 1.0” version of a screen-readable font, in my opinion. We’ve come a long way since then.

A brief history of the Verdana font

The Verdana font was released in 1996, so it’s a modern typeface. It was designed with one purpose in mind: to improve readability in text used very small on a computer screen.

Microsoft included Verdana as part of its Windows operating system, and so did Mac.

99% of Windows machines and 96% of Macs have it, so it’s widely compatible.

When typeface designers set out to make a typeface that will be readable at small sizes, they streamline the letters to remove flourishes that would get lost at a small size.

They also give the letters a large “x-height,” which is the vertical space between the baseline the letters sit on, and the top of lower-case letters like e, x, a, etc.

And they tend to add extra space between letters, because when typefaces are reduced very small, letters will blur together unless they’re spaced out quite a bit.

The examples below show you why I hate Verdana for regular text copy, and what it’s good for.

Read article …Why I Hate the Verdana Font