Business Colors: You Already Know The Most Important Rule

Red and blue. Maroon and white. Green and yellow.

What do your high school, your favorite sports team and most major corporations have in common? Two colors. They pick two main business colors to represent their organization, and you should, too.

It’s all about restraint

When it comes to color, the best policy is to restrain your hues. It sounds counterintuitive, but if you want your business to look good, you should stick to a limited palette of colors.

creating a brand that's recognizable by choosing a two-color palette

There’s a good reason for this. We expect our audience to associate specific images (like our logo and colors) with our business.

The less information we give them to “learn” about us, the better the chance they’ll absorb it.

Read article …Business Colors: You Already Know The Most Important Rule

Design Bloopers: This Ad Gives Me A Headache

This post is about a major design blooper, and this one touches on typography.

Noticing design bloopers is one of my favorite pastimes! (Ask anyone who lives with me).

I especially enjoy seeing major corporations make massively expensive design mistakes: it’s a good reminder that good and bad design are within reach of all of us (and sometimes even the big guys reach for bad design).

Read article …Design Bloopers: This Ad Gives Me A Headache

Design 101 | A Cheat Sheet That Will Keep You Honest

brand strategy includes choosing a typefaces and color palette for your business

What if I told you that all the previous posts in the Design 101 series could make you money?

They can, but only if you apply the idea that’s presented in this post.

Don’t go changin’

You want to sell, correct? Whether you’re selling services, products, or your charming personality, you want to sell. And people want to buy from you. Let me repeat: people want to buy from you. But who are you?

Your company, your brand, has standards of behavior. You treat your customers fairly, you’re responsive, you innovate. If you’re doing it right, your marketing materials reflect your company’s standards of behavior.

One of the most important actions you can take now is to be sure that your marketing is consistent over time. Because once your customer knows who you are, you build trust by presenting a cohesive brand every time your customer interacts with you: now, next month and next year.

Read article …Design 101 | A Cheat Sheet That Will Keep You Honest

Design 101 | Successful Design: Who’s in Charge Here?

To design a page that’s easy to understand, you have to discriminate.

That’s right: I’m advocating information discrimination. Deciding on a hierarchy for your information – from most important to least important – will help you decide how to place things, how large, bold or colorful they should be, and where you should put them on your screen or page.

Read article …Design 101 | Successful Design: Who’s in Charge Here?

Design 101 | Harness the Power of Color in your Marketing

Ahhh, color. What else in the design arsenal is as powerful and as dangerous as color?

brand strategy includes choosing color wisely

Dangerous? Yes! When properly implemented, color can give your marketing materials a polished, cohesive look.

But if you don’t handle color with care, your stuff will look terrible, or worse – be confusing.

Read article …Design 101 | Harness the Power of Color in your Marketing