Rich font examples with a photo of a pool overlooking a beautiful, upscale neighborhood.

Type Styles of the Rich and Famous

Typography tells a story: What do these rich font examples say?

Well-designed, rich fonts are beautiful to behold. Their angles and forms are an inspiration.

Fonts have a “personality,” and if you tune into what their shapes are trying to say, you can make those traits work for your business.

Let’s say on the other side of your town a company is developing an upscale neighborhood high on a hill overlooking the ocean. They’ve decided to call it “Grandview Estates.” Their tagline is “Rising Above the Rest.”

[Pretty snobby, right?]

Now let’s say you’ve been asked to design the sign that will sit at the entrance to the neighborhood.

You’ve been told that the sign needs to “reflect the caliber of people we want to attract to our estate properties.”

You know what that really means.

You need to attract rich people!

Time to break out …

Read article …Type Styles of the Rich and Famous

Why I Hate the Verdana Font

Of all the web-compatible typefaces available, the least appealing is the Verdana font.

And yes, I know it’s used all over. Believe me, I notice!

We’ve spoken about choosing typefaces and brand fonts a lot around here.

Your font matters — maybe more than you realize. Think about it:

Your font choice become the visual voice of your brand. Your words are delivered wrapped in fonts — is your font speaking in the brand voice you want?

So, is Verdana a good font choice, or a bad one? Is there a smart Verdana alternative?

The Verdana font was one of the earliest fonts designed for reading on screens. It’s a “web 1.0” version of a screen-readable font, in my opinion. We’ve come a long way since then.

Use your fonts to get attention online. Register and watch my free workshop, How to Use Visual Marketing to Get Attention — and Customers.

A brief history of the Verdana font

The Verdana font was released in 1996, so it’s a modern typeface. It was designed with one purpose in mind: to improve readability in text used very small on a computer screen.

Microsoft included Verdana as part of its Windows operating system, and so did Mac.

99% of Windows machines and 96% of Macs have it, so it’s widely compatible.

When typeface designers set out to make a typeface that will be readable at small sizes, they streamline the letters to remove flourishes that would get lost at a small size.

They also give the letters a large “x-height,” which is the vertical space between the baseline the letters sit on, and the top of lower-case letters like e, x, a, etc.

And they tend to add extra space between letters, because when typefaces are reduced very small, letters will blur together unless they’re spaced out quite a bit.

The examples below show you why I hate Verdana for regular text copy, and what it’s good for.

You’re about to see what I think is the best Verdana alternative, too.

Keep scrolling, my friend!

Read article …Why I Hate the Verdana Font

16 Essential Brand-Building Tips to Grow Your Business in the Year Ahead

16 Essential Brand-Building Tips to Grow Your Business in the Year Ahead


Your big brand doesn’t just happen. It’s not a fluke.

It’s the result of deliberate actions, taken consistently over time.

But what should you focus on first? And how should you go about getting things done?

In today’s post, I’m sharing sixteen ways you can whip your brand (and your online business) into shape. Take this list, and use it as:

Read article …16 Essential Brand-Building Tips to Grow Your Business in the Year Ahead

Don’t Do These 5 Dirty Design Deeds


brand building includes choosing a distinctive color palette, not the whole rainbowDesign is a series of decisions. When you know enough to make good decisions, everything you design looks better. And it’s not hard. Anyone can do it, even you!

Maybe it’s because I’m such a visual person, but I see a lot of really bad design decisions out there. I’m ready to call them what they are: dirty design deeds.

They’re cheap and they’re easy to abuse. You can avoid them once you know what they are.

In recognition of these dirty deeds, I’ve created a Please Stop list. If you’re using these techniques, please stop. Now.

Read article …Don’t Do These 5 Dirty Design Deeds

Please Don’t Squeeze the Letters


Remember the commercial whose tagline was “Please Don’t Squeeze the Charmin?” The premise was that Charmin toilet paper was so soft, customers couldn’t resist squeezing it every chance they got.

The same thing happens with typefaces. People can’t resist electronically “squeezing” and “stretching” letters to make them taller or wider. Don’t do it. Here’s why:

Read article …Please Don’t Squeeze the Letters